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Jan 05, 2022 / 27:44

EP 37: A Hacker From Hollywood

This is the story of a film star who connected the simple concept behind a player piano to complex communication technology in use in our devices today.

Hedy Lamarr is perhaps best known for the dozen or so motion pictures she made -- and as the most beautiful woman in the world -- but did you know that she also co-patented the frequency hopping spread spectrum technology that is the foundation for cellular, Wi-Fi, and even Bluetooth communications?

Dec 15, 2021 / 39:11

EP 36: Fuzzing Message Brokers

Fuzzing makes it possible to locate vulnerabilities even in “safe” environments like Erlang, a language designed for high availability and robust services.

Jonathan Knudsen from Synopsys joins The Hacker Mind to discuss his presentation at SecTor 2021 on fuzzing common message brokers such as RabbitMQ and VerneMQ, both written in Erlang, demonstrating that any type of software in any environment can still be vulnerable.

Dec 01, 2021 / 37:35

EP 35: Digital Forensics

So you’ve been hit with ransomware and, for whatever reason, you paid the bitcoin but now the decryptor doesn’t work. Who are you going to call for help?

Paula Januszkiewicz, from Cqure, joins The Hacker Mind to discuss her two presentations at SecTor 2021 on digital forensics. She talks about the various ways criminal hackers hide their work, what happens after ransomware hits on a system, how investigators go about looking for recovery information, and what type of skills those practitioners need to succeed.

Nov 16, 2021 / 01:01:24

EP 34: Hacking Behavioral Biometrics

AI is almost good enough at simulating human activity to defeat the biometric systems designed to fight fraud, effectively putting us back at square one.

Iain Paterson and Justin Macorin join The Hacker Mind podcast to share insights from their SecTor 2021 talk on hacking behavioral biometrics. If an adversarial actor wants to simulate user behavior, that actor can use techniques similar to those that a behavioral biometrics firm would use to detect abnormal usage. The researchers predict that soon it'll be hard to tell a human user at the keyboard, or at the mouse, from a bot or AI-driven entity.